Coaching for Professionals


If you work in engineering, academia, medicine, IT, or most other professions, chances are that you don’t know much about coaching.

But you should.

Coaching isn’t about fixing deficiencies. Coaching is about getting what you want out of your life and career.

A coach gives you an edge. In a competitive, demanding, rapidly changing world, that edge matters.

Coaching Video

Fortune Magazine asked Eric Schmidt, the Chairman and former CEO of Google,

“What was the best piece of advice you ever got?”

His answer might surprise you.

“Everybody needs a coach!”


Coaching for Professionals

Dr. Hester provides coaching for professionals like you.

What kind of people do I coach? Chances are, I coach people like you!

Successful, well-known astrophysicist to professional coach isn’t an obvious direction for a career to take. But those who have known me as mentor, teacher, advisor, colleague or friend would tell you that if anyone would take that step it would be me!

They might go on to say that I am nothing if not passionate, and that I am constitutionally incapable of doing something that I don’t believe in. I coach because I care about people, and because I have seen the coaching process work for clients again and again. 

From athletes, to artists, to business executives, most of the people who come to mind when you think, “top performer,” have personal professional coaches. There is a reason for that.

“My work with Jeff has had immediate and obvious benefits to me professionally. It is stretching and challenging me in unexpected ways, and it’s fun! Jeff is a fantastic coach.”

Dr. Andrew Westphal

Space Sciences Laboratory

UC Berkeley

Quoting Fortune Magazine, “Coaching is unlocking a person’s potential to maximize their own performance. It is helping them to learn rather than teaching them. Clients say coaching brings out their best by helping them focus, break down tasks and clarify their values.”

I don’t coach job titles; I coach people. My clients have included well-established scientists and policy makers. But they have also included small business owners, mid-career engineers, tenure-track faculty, and recent graduates making the transition into a new career. I’ve even coached young people thinking about college.

So, what kind of people do I coach? Chances are, I coach people like you!

When it comes right down to it, after a successful and high-profile career, these days I coach because I enjoy it. Coaching is fun and it’s rewarding. The people who I work with find it fun and rewarding as well. 

We run hard to stay in the same place.

I began my career as a professor armed with a wealth of specialized knowledge. The future was full of opportunity. I was making a name for myself in a demanding and competitive field. 

Successful professionals have a lot to gain from coaching

Give me a few minutes to talk about life as a professional, and the ways that coaching can help you get what you want out of your life and your career.

Now I found myself an administrator, personnel manager, teacher, accountant, mentor, group leader, computer systems administrator, university spokesperson and more. I was devoted to my wife and three children. I lived on airplanes. Life was often a political mine field, both within the university and beyond. 

Little in my training had prepared me for this reality. I loved what I did, and opportunity only grew. But was I making the most of that opportunity? In the rush, I didn’t always feel in control of my own life. Considered decision making often took a back seat to getting through the day, or the week, or the year.

While the details differ, almost every professional that I have spoken with has some version of that same story to tell. And they all seem to agree on one thing. Life is too often reactive and too seldom proactive.

Life is full of decisions made at full speed

Life is full of decisions made at high speed. It can be a challenge to get from where you are to where you want to be. As your coach I can help you take stock, weight options, and get more out of the journey.

If any of this sounds familiar then a coach could make a big difference in your life.

In the business world, coaching has become the go-to strategy for executives who want to take it to the next level, while at the same time finding more balance in their lives. You may or may not have a corner office, but the expectations facing today’s professional are every bit as demanding as those facing a CEO. Even environments like universities, once considered low-key, are becoming more and more corporate. Stress and burnout are at epidemic levels, and quite often it is the best and brightest who face the greatest challenges.

Coaching is an hour a week, taking stock and planning, together with someone who is focused on your success.

A coach isn’t there to give you answers. A coach is there to ask questions, offer fresh perspectives, and help you set goals. A coach helps you identify resources and see opportunity and options more clearly. A coach is a sounding board, a thinking partner and sometimes an early warning system. A coach can help you turn aspirations and insights into real plans, then turn those plans into effective, sustainable action.

You don’t have to do it all alone. As your coach I am there in your corner. My only agenda is your success.

A very wise man once told me, “If you aren’t having fun you aren’t doing it right!” I can help you keep what began as your passion from becoming a chore!

Try it for yourself

But I’m not asking you to take anybody’s word for it. Good professionals are a skeptical lot. That’s a good thing. The only real way to know is to try it out.

So to let you see for yourself, I’m pleased to offer a coaching conversation free of charge or obligation. We’ll set up a call and talk for an hour. At the end of the conversation you’ll have a better idea of what coaching is, how you might benefit, and whether I am the right coach for you.

There’s nothing to lose, but there could be a lot to gain. I look forward to hearing from you!


Coaching for Professionals  © Dr. Jeff Hester
Content may not be copied to other sites. All Rights Reserved.

Reality Straight Up!

  • Cassandra Smiling  Science, politics and a march in the rainPosted in For Your Consideration
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  • A Saguaro’s universe  Building a cactus starts with the Big BangPosted in For Your Consideration
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  • Fight-or-Flight  How our Pleistocene brains (mis)handle modern threatsPosted in Coaching
  • In a Shark’s Eye  Science and the experience of wonderPosted in For Your Consideration
  • The Quandry of Unpredictability  Chaos, climate and an unpredictable futurePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Why I March for SciencePosted in Thoughts
  • Waiting for Skynet  The benefits of being a machinePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Cassandra Smiling
    Science, politics and a march in the rain

    On a cold day in April, 2017 scientists gathered in Washington DC and cities around the world for the March for Science. Their message was a single powerful idea. Truth is not a political expediency. Reality cannot be ignored. In the year that has followed the vital importance of that message has only grown.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • EPA Rehash
    A suddenly partisan NASA faces its future

    When I look at NASA’s new Administrator, Jim Bridenstine, it is his fellow Oklahoman Scott Pruitt’s EPA that jumps to mind. As politically uncomfortable science is pushed aside, NASA’s history of nonpartisanship appears headed for an abrupt end. Will a strongly partisan NASA have a target on its back?

    Read Article

  • The Hermeneutics of Bunk
    Alan Sokal and postmodernism’s black eye

    Some years ago, NYU physicist Alan Sokal wondered whether anti-science postmodernists could recognize politically-correct-sounding nonsense even if he rubbed their noses in it. The unwitting subjects of the Sokal Hoax jumped at the bait.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • A Dunning-Kruger Universe
    Everyone, it seems, has a “theory”

    Some people are sure they know more than the experts, but it can take a lot of knowledge to realize just how wrong an idea is.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Our Need to Know
    We crave certainty, even when it is only an illusion

    The human brain craves the sensation of knowing like a drug addict craves the next fix. If real knowledge is uncomfortable or not at hand, we are quite content to just make something up, then convince ourselves it’s real. In a world where knowledge matters, that’s dangerous.

    Read Article

  • A Saguaro’s universe
    Building a cactus starts with the Big Bang

    The iconic saguaro cactus gives the desert an otherwordly beauty. That beauty does not exist in isolation. It embodies the fascinating and awe-inspiring processes that have shaped the universe, going all the way back to the Big Bang itself.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Oklahoma Skies
    To all the amateurs out there, thanks!

    Looking at room full of amateur astronomers, gathered for the Okie-Tex Star Party under the spectacularly dark skies of the Oklahoma Panhandle, I am reminded of my own roots and those who helped me discover the universe.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Fight-or-Flight
    How our Pleistocene brains (mis)handle modern threats

    A strong fight-or-flight reaction served our evolutionary ancestors well. If the leopard catches you, that’s it! But today a visceral response to a not-so-mortal threat seldom improves things. If you want to get a handle on those intense, counterproductive bouts of emotion, start by understanding where fight-or-flight came from in the first place.

    Read Article

  • In a Shark’s Eye
    Science and the experience of wonder

    Alone, 100 feet underwater, with a shark in its element, I am overwhelmed by a mixture of awe, beauty, joy, and intellectual wonder at the world that brings us together. In that moment, I experience just what science is all about.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • The Quandry of Unpredictability
    Chaos, climate and an unpredictable future

    Chaos is a sticky wicket for science. There are things a correct theory like climate change cannot predict, but there are a lot of things that it can. It’s important to understand which is which.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Why I March for Science

    On Earth Day, April 22, 2017, people around the nation will March for Science. It seems strange to need to march in support of the idea that pronouncements from politicians cannot change the nature of reality, or that evidence matters when making decisions. But such are the peculiar times in which we live.

    Read Article

  • Waiting for Skynet
    The benefits of being a machine

    For biological organisms, interstellar travel is hopelessly difficult, and probably pointless. For sentient machines, however, home is the environment you were built for.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

Click on thumbnail to select post:

Recent Article Mobile

  • Cassandra Smiling  Science, politics and a march in the rainPosted in For Your Consideration
  • EPA Rehash  A suddenly partisan NASA faces its futurePosted in Thoughts
  • The Hermeneutics of  Bunk  Alan Sokal and postmodernism’s black eyePosted in For Your Consideration
  • A Dunning-Kruger Universe  Everyone, it seems, has a “theory”Posted in For Your Consideration
  • Our Need to Know  We crave certainty, even when it is only an illusionPosted in CoachingThoughts
  • A Saguaro’s universe  Building a cactus starts with the Big BangPosted in For Your Consideration
  • Oklahoma Skies  To all the amateurs out there, thanks!Posted in For Your Consideration
  • Fight-or-Flight  How our Pleistocene brains (mis)handle modern threatsPosted in Coaching
  • In a Shark’s Eye  Science and the experience of wonderPosted in For Your Consideration
  • The Quandry of Unpredictability  Chaos, climate and an unpredictable futurePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Why I March for SciencePosted in Thoughts
  • Waiting for Skynet  The benefits of being a machinePosted in For Your Consideration
  • On a cold day in April, 2017 scientists gathered in Washington DC and cities around the world for the March for Science. Their message was a single powerful idea. Truth is not a political expediency. Reality cannot be ignored. In the year that has followed the vital importance of that message has only grown.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • When I look at NASA’s new Administrator, Jim Bridenstine, it is his fellow Oklahoman Scott Pruitt’s EPA that jumps to mind. As politically uncomfortable science is pushed aside, NASA’s history of nonpartisanship appears headed for an abrupt end. Will a strongly partisan NASA have a target on its back?

  • Some years ago, NYU physicist Alan Sokal wondered whether anti-science postmodernists could recognize politically-correct-sounding nonsense even if he rubbed their noses in it. The unwitting subjects of the Sokal Hoax jumped at the bait.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • Some people are sure they know more than the experts, but it can take a lot of knowledge to realize just how wrong an idea is.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • The human brain craves the sensation of knowing like a drug addict craves the next fix. If real knowledge is uncomfortable or not at hand, we are quite content to just make something up, then convince ourselves it’s real. In a world where knowledge matters, that’s dangerous.

  • The iconic saguaro cactus gives the desert an otherwordly beauty. That beauty does not exist in isolation. It embodies the fascinating and awe-inspiring processes that have shaped the universe, going all the way back to the Big Bang itself.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • Looking at room full of amateur astronomers, gathered for the Okie-Tex Star Party under the spectacularly dark skies of the Oklahoma Panhandle, I am reminded of my own roots and those who helped me discover the universe.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • A strong fight-or-flight reaction served our evolutionary ancestors well. If the leopard catches you, that’s it! But today a visceral response to a not-so-mortal threat seldom improves things. If you want to get a handle on those intense, counterproductive bouts of emotion, start by understanding where fight-or-flight came from in the first place.

  • Alone, 100 feet underwater, with a shark in its element, I am overwhelmed by a mixture of awe, beauty, joy, and intellectual wonder at the world that brings us together. In that moment, I experience just what science is all about.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • Chaos is a sticky wicket for science. There are things a correct theory like climate change cannot predict, but there are a lot of things that it can. It’s important to understand which is which.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • On Earth Day, April 22, 2017, people around the nation will March for Science. It seems strange to need to march in support of the idea that pronouncements from politicians cannot change the nature of reality, or that evidence matters when making decisions. But such are the peculiar times in which we live.

  • For biological organisms, interstellar travel is hopelessly difficult, and probably pointless. For sentient machines, however, home is the environment you were built for.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

Over his 30 year career as an internationally known astrophysicist, Dr. Jeff Hester was a key member of the team that repaired the Hubble Space Telescope. With one foot always on the frontiers of knowledge, he has been mentor, coach, team leader, award-winning teacher, administrator and speaker, to name a few of the hats he has worn. His Hubble image, the Pillars of Creation, was chosen by Time Magazine as among the 100 most influential photographs in history.
©Dr. Jeff Hester LLC, 5301 S. Superstition Mountain Dr., Suite 104 #171, Gold Canyon, AZ 85118