What you want from a great Keynote Speaker


Holding a meeting is a huge investment of time, money and effort, and the stakes are high for the sponsoring organization.

When choosing that all-important keynote, you can always go with yet another motivational speaker or yet another management consultant.

Or you could make this meeting something different that attendees will remember and talk about long after the meeting is done.

Speaking Video

“Dr. Jeff Hester was a hit at our summer leadership conference. He is a five-star speaker with a practical, hard-hitting message that goes to the core of what makes businesses succeed and fail.”

Julie Courtney

Senior Vice President

Independent Bankers Association of Texas


Measure a great keynote speaker by the impact of his message.

A great keynote speaker engages his audience. He draws people in. He entertains. He establishes a rapport. He blows listeners’ minds a bit. They want to know more. A great keynote speaker gets people out of their comfort zone. He inspires his audience with what is possible, shows them new possibilities and challenges them to expect more.

But sometimes entertainment and inspiration don’t last much beyond the coffee break. To judge a keynote speaker, watch and see whether having heard him, people find themselves thinking and talking about their world in new and powerful ways. See if people find themselves becoming aware of things that they used to miss. See if they are asking different sorts of questions, or pausing for a moment before they give what used to seem an obvious answer.

Give your audience a chance to spend some time with an internationally known astrophysicist and member of the Hubble Space Telescope team who Emmy Award Winning broadcaster Hugh Downs described as “one of the greatest explainers in our midst today.”

A great keynote speaker does more than add to the quality of your meeting. He also plants powerful ideas that continue to grow after the meeting is done. Those ideas should include practical tools that your audience can put to work, benefiting both themselves and your organization.

I invite you to look around my site to get a deeper understanding of my message. What you will find boils down to this. Everything that you do or say, every decision that you make, every success that you enjoy or failure that you endure, is rooted in what you think that you know. Without reliable, authentic knowledge, you are adrift with no star to steer by.

But in a world where the defining reality is ever-accelerating change, knowledge is a very slippery thing. That is true whether you are talking about knowledge of your business, your profession, or yourself. When it really matters, there is one and only one standard of knowledge that offers you the best chance of success!


Entertainment Billboard

 Entertainment!

When it comes to mind-bending “Cool!,” astrophysics is just really hard to beat.

Inspiration Billboard

Inspiration!

From hopeless disaster, to miraculous recovery, to revolutionizing our view of the universe, the Hubble Space Telescope is inspirational drama on a cosmic scale.

Impact Billboard

Impact!

The world will tell you before the tidal wave hits. It will also point you to the next big idea. Dr. Hester will give your audience the tools that they need to listen.


I will partner with you to help make your event a success

What is gravity?
Explaining gravity in 90 seconds for National Geographic.

I will work with you to provide your organization with all of that and more. I also understand that when holding a meeting, attendance is everything. I am experienced and media-savvy, and will partner with you to help you promote your event.

You might also ask about an after-dinner or public talk about the wonders of the universe to add something fresh and exciting. If your meeting is in Phoenix, there might even be the possibility of a multimedia presentation using the planetarium facilities at the Arizona Science Center.

Schedule permitting, I am also happy to make myself available for those all-so-important informal conversations. Time and again I’ve seen a conversation that begins with, “I’ve always loved astronomy” quickly evolve into, “Here is what I am facing; how can your message help me?”


Speaking Programs

All keynotes are custom. I will consult with you to understand the focus of your event, and then tailor my message to your strategic goals.

The program titles and descriptions below are examples of the direction a presentation might take.

What you want from a great Keynote Speaker  © Dr. Jeff Hester
Content may not be copied to other sites. All Rights Reserved.

Reality Straight Up!

  • Our Need to Know  We crave certainty, even when it is only an illusionPosted in CoachingThoughts
  • A Saguaro’s universe  Building a cactus starts with the Big BangPosted in For Your Consideration
  • Oklahoma Skies  To all the amateurs out there, thanks!Posted in For Your Consideration
  • Fight-or-Flight  How our Pleistocene brains (mis)handle modern threatsPosted in Coaching
  • In a Shark’s Eye  Science and the experience of wonderPosted in For Your Consideration
  • The Quandry of Unpredictability  Chaos, climate and an unpredictable futurePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Why I March for SciencePosted in Thoughts
  • Waiting for Skynet  The benefits of being a machinePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Where Are They?  Why E.T. might stay homePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Pulsars and Neutrinos  The history that LIGO forgotPosted in For Your Consideration
  • Not The End of Science  The emerging science of processPosted in For Your Consideration
  • Layer Upon Layer  The evolving edifice of sciencePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Our Need to Know
    We crave certainty, even when it is only an illusion

    The human brain craves the sensation of knowing like a drug addict craves the next fix. If real knowledge is uncomfortable or not at hand, we are quite content to just make something up, then convince ourselves it’s real. In a world where knowledge matters, that’s dangerous.

    Read Article

  • A Saguaro’s universe
    Building a cactus starts with the Big Bang

    The iconic saguaro cactus gives the desert an otherwordly beauty. That beauty does not exist in isolation. It embodies the fascinating and awe-inspiring processes that have shaped the universe, going all the way back to the Big Bang itself.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Oklahoma Skies
    To all the amateurs out there, thanks!

    Looking at room full of amateur astronomers, gathered for the Okie-Tex Star Party under the spectacularly dark skies of the Oklahoma Panhandle, I am reminded of my own roots and those who helped me discover the universe.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Fight-or-Flight
    How our Pleistocene brains (mis)handle modern threats

    A strong fight-or-flight reaction served our evolutionary ancestors well. If the leopard catches you, that’s it! But today a visceral response to a not-so-mortal threat seldom improves things. If you want to get a handle on those intense, counterproductive bouts of emotion, start by understanding where fight-or-flight came from in the first place.

    Read Article

  • In a Shark’s Eye
    Science and the experience of wonder

    Alone, 100 feet underwater, with a shark in its element, I am overwhelmed by a mixture of awe, beauty, joy, and intellectual wonder at the world that brings us together. In that moment, I experience just what science is all about.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • The Quandry of Unpredictability
    Chaos, climate and an unpredictable future

    Chaos is a sticky wicket for science. There are things a correct theory like climate change cannot predict, but there are a lot of things that it can. It’s important to understand which is which.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Why I March for Science

    On Earth Day, April 22, 2017, people around the nation will March for Science. It seems strange to need to march in support of the idea that pronouncements from politicians cannot change the nature of reality, or that evidence matters when making decisions. But such are the peculiar times in which we live.

    Read Article

  • Waiting for Skynet
    The benefits of being a machine

    For biological organisms, interstellar travel is hopelessly difficult, and probably pointless. For sentient machines, however, home is the environment you were built for.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Where Are They?
    Why E.T. might stay home

    It would be fun to think there is a flourishing interstellar civilization of humanoid aliens out there. But then it would also be nice to believe in unicorns and midichlorians. It would be nice, but they probably aren’t there.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Pulsars and Neutrinos
    The history that LIGO forgot

    Gilding the lily makes everybody look bad. When the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory detected ripples in the fabric of space-time from a pair of merging black holes, it was a technological and scientific accomplishment without peer! But LIGO did not “discover” gravity waves.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Not The End of Science
    The emerging science of process

    Fundamental change is always messy. As science tackles the complex processes that shape the real world it is having to reinvent itself on the fly. Welcome to the Wild West!

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

  • Layer Upon Layer
    The evolving edifice of science

    As science has evolved from simple observation to deep understanding, each new way of thinking about the world has transformed not only science, but human society. That evolution is far from over.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

    Read Article

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Recent Article Mobile

  • Our Need to Know  We crave certainty, even when it is only an illusionPosted in CoachingThoughts
  • A Saguaro’s universe  Building a cactus starts with the Big BangPosted in For Your Consideration
  • Oklahoma Skies  To all the amateurs out there, thanks!Posted in For Your Consideration
  • Fight-or-Flight  How our Pleistocene brains (mis)handle modern threatsPosted in Coaching
  • In a Shark’s Eye  Science and the experience of wonderPosted in For Your Consideration
  • The Quandry of Unpredictability  Chaos, climate and an unpredictable futurePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Why I March for SciencePosted in Thoughts
  • Waiting for Skynet  The benefits of being a machinePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Where Are They?  Why E.T. might stay homePosted in For Your Consideration
  • Pulsars and Neutrinos  The history that LIGO forgotPosted in For Your Consideration
  • Not The End of Science  The emerging science of processPosted in For Your Consideration
  • Layer Upon Layer  The evolving edifice of sciencePosted in For Your Consideration
  • The human brain craves the sensation of knowing like a drug addict craves the next fix. If real knowledge is uncomfortable or not at hand, we are quite content to just make something up, then convince ourselves it’s real. In a world where knowledge matters, that’s dangerous.

  • The iconic saguaro cactus gives the desert an otherwordly beauty. That beauty does not exist in isolation. It embodies the fascinating and awe-inspiring processes that have shaped the universe, going all the way back to the Big Bang itself.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • Looking at room full of amateur astronomers, gathered for the Okie-Tex Star Party under the spectacularly dark skies of the Oklahoma Panhandle, I am reminded of my own roots and those who helped me discover the universe.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • A strong fight-or-flight reaction served our evolutionary ancestors well. If the leopard catches you, that’s it! But today a visceral response to a not-so-mortal threat seldom improves things. If you want to get a handle on those intense, counterproductive bouts of emotion, start by understanding where fight-or-flight came from in the first place.

  • Alone, 100 feet underwater, with a shark in its element, I am overwhelmed by a mixture of awe, beauty, joy, and intellectual wonder at the world that brings us together. In that moment, I experience just what science is all about.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • Chaos is a sticky wicket for science. There are things a correct theory like climate change cannot predict, but there are a lot of things that it can. It’s important to understand which is which.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • On Earth Day, April 22, 2017, people around the nation will March for Science. It seems strange to need to march in support of the idea that pronouncements from politicians cannot change the nature of reality, or that evidence matters when making decisions. But such are the peculiar times in which we live.

  • For biological organisms, interstellar travel is hopelessly difficult, and probably pointless. For sentient machines, however, home is the environment you were built for.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • It would be fun to think there is a flourishing interstellar civilization of humanoid aliens out there. But then it would also be nice to believe in unicorns and midichlorians. It would be nice, but they probably aren’t there.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • Gilding the lily makes everybody look bad. When the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory detected ripples in the fabric of space-time from a pair of merging black holes, it was a technological and scientific accomplishment without peer! But LIGO did not “discover” gravity waves.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • Fundamental change is always messy. As science tackles the complex processes that shape the real world it is having to reinvent itself on the fly. Welcome to the Wild West!

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

  • As science has evolved from simple observation to deep understanding, each new way of thinking about the world has transformed not only science, but human society. That evolution is far from over.

    This article originally appeared in my Astronomy Magazine column, For Your Consideration.

Over his 30 year career as an internationally known astrophysicist, Dr. Jeff Hester was a key member of the team that repaired the Hubble Space Telescope. With one foot always on the frontiers of knowledge, he has been mentor, coach, team leader, award-winning teacher, administrator and speaker, to name a few of the hats he has worn. His Hubble image, the Pillars of Creation, was chosen by Time Magazine as among the 100 most influential photographs in history.
©Dr. Jeff Hester LLC, 5301 S. Superstition Mountain Dr., Suite 104 #171, Gold Canyon, AZ 85118